Professor Caitlin Fisher

Director of York University Augmented Reality Lab, Toronto, Canada
Professor Caitlin Fisher

Professor Caitlin Fisher

Director of York University Augmented Reality Lab, Toronto, Canada
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Biography

Caitlin Fisher directs the Augmented Reality Lab at York University in Toronto, Canada, where she held the Canada Research Chair in Digital Culture for the past decade. A 2013 Fulbright Chair, Fisher is the recipient of many international awards for digital storytelling including the Electronic Literature Award for Fiction (for the hypermedia novella These Waves of Girls ) and the International Vinaròs Prize for Electronic Literature (for the augmented reality poemAndromeda, one of the first poems ever created in AR). Recent work has been shortlisted for the UK New Media Writing Prize (Circle) and the Robert Coover Award (Everyone at this Party is Dead, a virtual reality novella, also selected for inclusion in the 2016 Electronic Literature Collection ). She serves on the international Board of Directors for both the Electronic Literature Organization and HASTAC, the Humanities Arts Science Technology Alliance and Collaboratory. Fisher is currently engaged in a four-year research project exploring new literary forms in augmented reality, creating long-form interactive mobile narratives.

 

ABSTRACT: MIXED REALITIES: POETRY AT THE EDGE OF SCIENCE, THE DISSEMINATION OF SECRETS AND THE MAGIC LOOKING GLASS OF FAILURE

The augmented reality lab I direct exists at the intersection of art and science, but with storytelling firmly at its centre. For over twenty years, my research and creative practice has been in the area of digital literatures and my talk, here, is a mix of artist talk, excavation, and speculation. I will introduce some of the technologies we’ve used and developed and some literary projects my students and I have created over the years, some of which have never circulated beyond the lab, some of them failures along multiple dimensions which nevertheless inform both my current work and serve as magic looking glasses to machines and literatures of the near-future.